Volume 3, Issue 1, February 2015, Page: 8-15
Visual Participatory as an Analytic Tool in Managing Violence among Students in an Urban Secondary School in Zimbabwe
Ephias Gudyanga, Midlands State University, Faculty of Education, Department of Educational Foundations, Management and Curriculum Studies, Gweru, Zimbabwe
Nomsa Matamba, Midlands State University, Faculty of Education, Department of Educational Foundations, Management and Curriculum Studies, Gweru, Zimbabwe
Received: Jan. 14, 2015;       Accepted: Jan. 22, 2015;       Published: Feb. 10, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijsedu.20150301.12      View  1927      Downloads  116
Abstract
The research was set to determine management practices of students’ violent behaviour in an urban secondary school in Zimbabwe. The visual participatory methodology was used. Drawings and focus group discussions were the focal methods employed to generate data from 15 conveniently sampled participants over a period of two weeks. Involvement of parents, police, heads of schools and the perpetrators of violence were noted as violence reduction management practices. The school must adopt transparent and holistic approach where stakeholders including communities must engage with one another in an endeavour to eliminate violence. It was concluded that violence in schools can be eliminated.
Keywords
Violence, Visual Participatory, School, Behaviour
To cite this article
Ephias Gudyanga, Nomsa Matamba, Visual Participatory as an Analytic Tool in Managing Violence among Students in an Urban Secondary School in Zimbabwe, International Journal of Secondary Education. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2015, pp. 8-15. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsedu.20150301.12
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